Car Hacking : Nex-Gen Technology

#Car Hacking

#Car Hacking

Not too long ago, securing a car meant popping the faceplate off the CD player, slapping a Club over the steering wheel, and locking the doors. As vehicles’ electronic systems evolve, however, automobiles are starting to require the same protection as laptop computers and e-commerce servers.

Currently, there’s nothing to stop anyone with malicious intent and some ­computer-programming skills from taking command of your vehicle. After gaining access, a hacker could control everything from which song plays on the radio to whether the brakes work.

While there are no reported cases of cars being maliciously hacked in the real world(WELL RECENTLY NOW CASES HAVE BEEN REPORTED IN 2013 REGARDING WHISTLE BLOWER #MICHAELHASTING’S CAR BEING SABOTAGED BY THE CIA), in 2010, researchers affiliated with the Center for Automotive Embedded Systems Security (CAESS—a partnership between the University of California San Diego and the University of Washington) demonstrated how to take over all of a car’s vital systems by plugging a device into the OBD-II port under the dashboard.

It gets worse. In a paper that’s due to be published later this year, those same researchers remotely take control of an unnamed vehicle through its telematics system. They also demonstrate that it’s theoretically possible to hack a car with malware embedded in an MP3 and with code transmitted over a Wi-Fi connection.

Such breaches are possible because the dozens of  independently operating computers on modern vehicles are all connected through an in-car communications network known as a controller-area-network bus, or CAN bus.

Even though vital systems such as the throttle, brakes, and steering are on a separate part of the network that’s not directly connected to less secure infotainment and diagnostic systems, the two networks are so entwined that an entire car can be hacked if any single component is breached.

So the possibility now exists for platoons of cars to go rogue at the command of computer-savvy terrorists, crazed exes, and parking attendants with Ph.D.s in computer science. But the truth is that hacking a car takes a lot of  time, effort, and money—three resources automakers are using to fight back.

At Chrysler, where optional infotainment systems are integrated with hard drives and mobile internet hot spots, company spokesman Vince Muniga says a data breach of an individual automobile is “highly unlikely.” That doesn’t mean the company is ignoring the problem. “It’s an ongoing engineering issue,” he says. “You want to stay one step ahead of what these guys might do.” Rich Strader, Ford’s director of information technology security and strategy, says the automaker has been steadily strengthening in-vehicle systems, but the threat is always evolving. He says the difficulty with security is that “you can’t honestly say something is impossible.”

Presently, automakers are beginning to take steps to secure networks the same way the information-technology sector now locks down corporate servers. “Just like the internet in its early days, car networks don’t employ very much security,” says Brad Hein, a programmer who accessed vehicle data from his 2006 Chevy Impala on an Android phone using code he’d written. “As more people start to access car networks,” Hein says, “I expect that the auto industry will start beefing up the security.”

That’s certainly happening at OnStar, the telematics system that’s already in more than 6 million vehicles. Eric Gassenfeit, OnStar’s chief information security officer, says his team has seen resources and staff grow “by an order of magnitude” over the past two years.

So the battle between the hackers and the carmakers is on. Here are your car’s most vulnerable entry points and what automakers are doing to protect them:

can-your-car-be-hacked-illustration-inline-photo-522378-s-original

Well luckily here in kenya its safe to say that were not vulnerable to such vices yet, but it s good to keep our eyes peeled. Knowledge is power

STORY COURTESY: CARANDDRIVE.COM

 

 

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About TechMaffia
Computer Science Student, With a passion and enthusiasm for the Techworld, Growing tech guru, graphic and design, software and app design...and a whole database of anything in the technological bracket

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